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20121027
20121104
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. but they're very small. it's a very small part of the navy. >> in the marine corps' completely separate from the navy now. >> dairy sector service inside the department of the navy. but this became really contentious throughout the course of history. a corporate claim and they served aboard ship that they should follow the rules of the navy, the regulation of the department of the navy. when they served assurer to the army bishop of the regulation of the army and eventually in 1832? became a separate service inside the department. >> out of their mission change? >> commission didn't change so much then. there've been ship cards offer to the 20th century, but they were something of a jack of all trades. they would do other jobs as well, most often serving as landing parties in the navy would send sailors on punitive expeditions, the marines would always participate in that. in the start of the 20th century company took on a variety of other missions, colonial infantry in haiti, philippines, nicaragua and before world war ii, they started creating amphibious landing forces. they became ex
book "the warrior's heart". an adaptation of his memoirs of becoming a navy seal. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> a round of applause. thank you very much. one of the things that is fun about being here, i am from st. louis. it is good to do these things. i have some wonderful people who saved my life, my second grade teacher is with me tonight. welcome hats. [applause] >> if this book can have the kind of defect on one person's like that hat and my other teachers had on me it will be a very successful books so thank you for being out here tonight. i appreciate it. i will begin the book reading from the beginning where i asked young people to imagine themselves in a navy seal training and this is how it starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in your body throbs with pain. you are exhausted beyond anything you could ever imagine and all around you the night air curses and groans and others who are getting it out like you, trying to survive the night. most won't. you know the statistics. one in ten will make it through this week, will survive hours
"the warrior's heart" an app adaptation of becoming a navy seal for young adultings. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. [applause] thank you so much. [applause] thank you. can i get a round of applause for will? [cheers and applause] fantastic, buddy, thank you very much. [applause] thank you. one of the things that's follow-up for me about being here tonight as gary mentioned, i'm from st. louis, good to do these things in st. louis, and i have wonderful people who shaped my life who are in the front row. my second grade teacher here with me tonight. welcome pat. [applause] i know that if this book can have the kind of effect on just one person's life that pat and my other teachers had on me, this will be a very successful book so thank you very much for being out here tonight. i appreciate. i'm going to begin the book reading right from the very beginning of the book where i asked young people to imagine themselves in the navy seal training, and this is how it starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in
from the very beginning where i asked jack people to imagine themselves in the navy seals training. this is out its starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in your body throbs with pain. you're exhausted beyond anything you could ever imagine, and all around you the night air carries the curses and groans of others who are getting it out like you, trying to survive the night. most won't. you know the statistics. maybe one in ten will make it through this we can survive hours, days of the punishment required to become a navy s.e.a.l. that water is dark around you, but you can make out lights on the beach. roy member your instructors words as the center toward the horizon, their voices booming over the bull horn. say goodnight to the sun. the night is going to be a very, very long night. your imagine another hundred hours of this. you see yourself plunging over and over into the icy water pulling yourself out again. you imagine endless repetition of ceps, flutter kicks, pushups. surf torture, they call it. they leave here in freezing water. not just for a f
serving in iraq and afghanistan. this event held on september 11, 2012 is hosted by the navy memorial here in washington d.c. it's just under an hour. [applause] the mac thanks to all my classmates and coeditors and mentors who helped make this possible. in february to the night vision this book. everything is happening for me as an active-duty salt and afghanistan in kandahar. i was working for general nick nicholson, doing cool things is a swell stansell are now, supporting my country. maybe i should do a book. really, compared to ben wagner? really, compared to jacob sabe? and f-18 pilot to saved the stryker battalion. well, made cbs colleague, jason jackson. the story of this book were exceptional and i that i will ask us present at 2002 it could connect the stories come from personalities together to weave together a book that could define this decade through leadership ones. so i called carol andersen. carol andersen wasserstein richard in a helicopter accident. i called her on the phone as i did all the mothers who go for the book who lost their sons and i said carol, i would like t
the royal navy needed every hand it could find on deck. the consequent british practice of boarding american ships to round up having a bound british seamen provoked enormous controversy more so because the efforts could at times sweep americans into british it nets. in the midst of such moral and political confusion both americans and the british made scattershot efforts to maintain the better claim to virtue. the rising crisis with britain in the early years of the 1800s compounded every element of the promise rapped the problems of population in the united states. americans faced a especially important intellectual academic adversary in the form of the british theorist. thomas malfac . he was author of a book you probably heard of essay on the principlep population. you may not know its subtitle. it was an inquiry into our prospects respecting the future removal or mitigation of the evils that it occasions. it was first published in the england in 1798 and it was reprinted in the united states in a local edition by 18 owe 3. malpass offered his model of population not as scientific extrac
army and navy to provide at that time. so anderson really said look, i can't maintain myself fear, but there's no way you can, help me. anderson fully expected he would be told to withdraw. now, when you come down to the final crisis when lincoln decides what he's going to do is to send an expedition that will provide supplies to major anderson, though he did not send troops or munitions, when the confederate commander in charleston sent his delegation out to anderson to kill anderson that you've got to surrender, or we will reduce you. anderson at the point told them, look, i've got to leave in two days, by the 15th of april, so that's a factor he said if you come at me i will fight back. ball regard census information to my comment because he relies this is a question of peace and what the the work in the coming as conduct for modern, look, if anderson was this what exactly is going to leave, then you don't take them out. otherwise you reduce the ford. anderson said to them, i will leave at noon on april 15, unless, unless i was a different borders from my government are i am re
, which is the air force version of the navy school. i darted down the navy school, kind of an abbreviated exchange. it is okay, but they're not half of what we are. because the air force? okay, good. never mind the football game today, that's irrelevant. the whole taking off and landing on a carrier. it's a good school, but wasn't anything like ours. ours is six months long and utterly miserable. i came out of that a change to the reading. some say for the better. i lost almost all of my cockiness, quite a few tailfeathers and spent the next decade be the weapons and tactics officer at different levels. i was at khobar towers would not place blew up. two-faced member that? may not want to sit too close to me because i'm always in the wrong place at the wrong time. yeah, i was there when that place blew up. i don't think any of us were thinking about terrorism than the way thought of now. it wasn't something we were prepared to fight. my generation was geared up to fight the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, you know, she says what's wrong with russia? i said it's not russia, it's
him successfully beyond united states army and navy so rarely he said i cannot maintain myself but there is no way you can come help me. he expected he would be told to withdraw. coming down to the final crisis to send an expedition not to send troops more munitions beauregard said his delegation to tell anderson you have to surrender or we will reduce you perk up that point* he said i have to leave in today's i will fly back. beauregard took the information to mcgovern a. it was over peace anwr. if he would specify when he will leave them don't take him out. then anderson said i will leave it noon april 15. unless i receive different orders from my government or i reinforced at that time the confederates new the relief mission was on route to some of that answer would not do because he did not promise unequivocal a cell he was told firing would commence properly. and it did. he never made the proposal of those terms. >> but just to speculate did abraham lincoln know what was going to have been in fort sumner? >> he did the trick anybody. he had every reason and to expect seven
is the air force version of the navy school. i'd already done the navy school, kind of abbreviated exchange. it was okay but they're not half of what we are, so -- you guys air force? good. so never mind the football game today. they -- that's irrelevant. that whole landing on a carrier thing, they can keep it. it was good school but not like ours, ours is six months long and utterly miserable. i came out of that a changed human being. some say for the better. i lost almost all of my cockiness. quite a few tail feathers, and then spent the next decade being a weapons and tactics officer at different levels in the fighter wing. i was at kobar towers when that blew up. remember that? may not want to sit too close to me. i'm in the wrong place at the wrong time. i was there when that place blew up. we hadn't really -- i don't think any of us were thinking about terrorism then the way it's thought of now. i wasn't something we were prepared to fight. my generation was geared up to fight the soviet union. i ask my teenage daughter -- she say, what wrong with russia? i said, it's not russia. it w
educational opportunities i joined the u.s. 80 -- navy and spend four years in the military and applied for the u.s. border patrol and i was blessed with a tremendous career, tremendous family. i ended up along the border as u.s. border patrol agents going through the ranks and started using what i felt was a talent i was blessed with, being able to infiltrate drug cartels, human smuggling cartels and did more undercover work than any federal agent in the history of the government's over a 30 year career and i am happy to share those experiences because they are unique because i was the only federal agent who experienced being smuggled from mexico to the interior of the united states, going through travels by myself in the back of the trunk of a car, things of that nature. it was quite dramatic but something i did with a lot of pride because i felt going after those seeking a better life in the united states i share those stories with you in my book the shadow catcher. >> there are many powerful moments you describe. i am wondering if you could share a couple of those with us. in partic
.s. paper. there are a lot of pictures of the pirate ship that was seized by the argentine navy but let me tell you something. that is the biggest battle on this planet which is not about syria. it's not about pakistan. that sailing ship is the naval action of the biggest battle on this planet. paul the vulture singer, and romney are co romney has a piece of it. a small piece but you know a couple hundred million. a small piece. these vultures have attacked the nation of argentina saying that all the money that argentina once owned many years ago, new york banks -- do we care about the story oh argentine bank. argentine defaulted. no they didn't. they said we are not paying you a serious raid and if they did well and they did because they were not being killed, we will give you peace of argentina. they have citibank in jpmorgan and we have stock in argentina which was doing very well and then call the vulture singer swooped down and said that's fine just like he did with delphi and the auto parts. i have got you by the parts in detroit and now i have you in argentina. he doesn't want to ju
school, served as commission officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you. i also have the distinction that i read and commented on stewart -- john stuart's book. no one has come after me today. the biggest incendiary, you should have read the draft i read. i am one of the few lawyers who practices in front of the supreme court who did not file a brief in the fisher case. let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative-action. the question in this case is the university of texas violated the equal protection clause in connection with undergraduate admission programs and abigail fisher when she was injured by what the university of texas did? i want to start by explaining a little more than stuart did about the admission program and what it is supposed to do and what it is not supposed to do and what it does or doesn't do so we have the top 10%. this guarantees anyone who graduates in the top 10% of their high school class in texas,
and is a graduate of yale university and harvard law school served as a commission officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> i also have the distinction of two things. i read and comment on stuart's book. i don't get a medal of honor for that. my name is and the acknowledgement so no one has come after me yet and if you think it is incendiary. second, and also one of the few lawyers and practices in the supreme court who didn't file a brief and the fisher case. okay, so let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative action the university of texas violate the equal protection clause in connection with its undergraduate emission program and did abigail fisher was she injured by what the university of texas did and i want to start by explaining the emissions program will and it's not supposed to do and what it does and doesn't do. as we have the top 10%. this guarantees anyone that graduates the top 10% of their high school class. if you want to be
this was the scene outside portsmouth navy yard in portsmouth, new hampshire, and i had never seen anything like it. there's a ship change. i don't know how many thousands of people come through the gate and general hague was there with some of his campaign workers and it was like he was a positive magnet and they were a post any magnet and people were just veering away from him. he literally had to run from one side of the gallet to the other side -- gate to the other side, there were two openings, trying to find people to shake hands with and this was one of the moments where he had gone over to the other side and just called out to this worker and just stepped into shake his hand. >> what did you think of him? >> again, he's a very interesting man, very forceful, articulate, intelligent. obviously the voters didn't consider him presidential cal -- caliber. >> this picture of bruce babbitt. >> this is what candidates have to go through, and everybody is saying, oh, that's a bell helmet, bicycle riding, that's a cold weather face bask r mask. -- mask he has on. it was another photo op and it was a
he was in the navy, mark, speaking of war, could you please give us just a couple of minutes talk about the vietnam years and its effects on lbj and those around him? >> i think lbj was very reluctant about vietnam. he was ambivalent about it from the very beginning. i think that there are a couple of phone conversations. the crown jewel of the lbj library. 643 hours of recordings of his phone conversation. there are two in particular. to that really illuminate how he felt. the first was with richard russell, who i mentioned earlier, who had said, you know, if this burden were thrust on me, mr. president, i would decline to fight the war in vietnam. and it just seems like another thing and lbj said i have been thinking the same way ever since i came to office. and george bundy, his national security adviser, lbj talked about laying awake all night and thinking about the war. and he said that it is halting. he says what is beyond me? what is vietnam to this country? and he realizes. it is of no great consequence to the united states. it doesn't mean much. except for the fact that i
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)